Teaching Stages

teacher with young children

You ever hear of the five stages of grief? Apparently, teaching has a very similar path. I’m joking of course, but most first-year teachers find that they follow a teaching path five with five distinct stages: anticipation, survival, disillusionment, rejuvenation, and reflection. This path isn’t meant to deter you, it’s to show you that the first year is the hardest, but you can definitely get through it! Read on and take a look at each stage.

Disillusionment

teacher helping young child

Disillusionment is the next and lowest stage. I wish I could say that my first year of teaching was perfect, but I did become depressed and I seriously questioned my abilities. Some of your biggest concerns will be classroom management, curriculum pacing, parent conferences, and your own sanity! After you’ve taught for six months and had some school holidays, you’ll be able to rejuvenate. You’ll find your idealism but you’ll have a better perspective on classroom realities.

Anticipation

women smiling

Your anticipation may manifest itself as anxiety and excitement. One of my professors said that many first-year teachers tend to glamorise their position in their heads and make tremendous goals that are great in theory, but pretty difficult in actuality. This anticipation is good because it will carry you through the first few weeks of school. After the first month, you’re going to get overwhelmed and survival mode will hit! Seasoned teachers have their curriculum down, but you’ll have to spend lots of time figuring out what works and what doesn’t.

Reflection

teacher teaching class students raising their hands

As the school year wraps up, you’ll be able to take a breather! This is a time for reflection. My sister thought she would quit after her first year, but she gave it one more go and her second year was significantly better. I too, had a rough first year, but the second was so much better. I really reflected on what I learned and how I handled my classroom, and I was able to adjust my teaching vision accordingly.

Recent Posts

  • Maintaining Good Balance At Heights

    July 18th, 2014

    You can have the most secure tether in the world and all the safety gear that your frame can support, but the single most important function of working at heights [...]

  • SCADA Industrial Distribution Systems So...

    July 3rd, 2014

    Industrial distribution companies use SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition) to administer industrial control systems (ICS) networks to critical infrastructure operations. SCADA are remote command systems infrastructure that send coded [...]

  • Help Your Child Build Confidence in Publ...

    June 26th, 2014

    If you’ve got a shy child, you know that their worst nightmare probably involves being the center of attention in front of a crowd of people. When shy children are [...]

  • 2 Signs That Your Child Is Ready For Kin...

    May 8th, 2014

    Every parent wants to know that his or her child is ready for kindergarten. Sending your child to a well-equipped preschool is one of the best ways to make sure [...]

  • 5 Tips To Teach Your Children Patience

    May 6th, 2014

    From a young age, children are constantly being asked to wait. They have to wait in lines, wait their turn, and wait for your attention. Patience is clearly a virtue [...]